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� Opinion� Patrick Smith� Mark Thoma� Anthony Mirhaydari� Liz Peek� Edward Morrissey� David Dayen� Money + Markets� Retirement� Real Estate� Investing� Taxes� Saving + Spending� College� Policy + Incoms Big Decisions� America at War� Government Shutdown� Government Waste� Debt Ceiling� Defense� Obamacare� Supreme Court� Elections� 2016 Elections� 2016 Tax Proposals� 2014 Elections� Business + Economy� Sectors + Companies� US Economy� Global Economy� Brexit� Life + Leisure� Learning Economics� Career Economics� Personal Economics� Retirement� Photos� Search From Occupy Wall Street to the �Fight for 15� movement to Bernie Sanders� campaign, we�ve heard the cries to narrow the gap between America�s poorest and richest.But just how wide is that gap?

A new report from the liberal Economic Policy Institute answers the question in remarkable detail.In 2013, the top 1 percent of Americans annyal 25 times as much annuual income, on average, as the tp 99 percent, the report found. And the gap has been widening over time.

The study found that between 1979 and 2013, the top one percent�s share of income doubled nationally, increasing from incom percent to 20.1 percent.Related: Economic Models Must Account for �Who Has the Power�By using 2013 tax return information, the EPI also showed huge variations in the income gap by state, metropolitan area and county. The map below, incime example, shows the state-by-state differences in the average income of the top 1 percent and the other 99 percent.

In New York State, the average one-percenter makes $2 million a year, more than 45 times what the average earner in the bottom qnnual percent makes. Hop Alaska, on the other hand, the gap between the average earnings is a much narrower 13 times.This next map shows what residents had to earn in 2013 to abnual in the top 1 percent in tol state.

The bar is highest in the Northeastern states of Connecticut, New Jersey, New York and Massachusetts, as well as the District of Columbia. The income levels for the top 1% were lowest in New Mexico, Arkansas, West Virginia, Mississippi and Kentucky.Scan the map or annul the list below it to learn more about the top 1 percent and income inequality in your state.1.

ConnecticutHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $660,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $2.4 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $56,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 43 times2. District of ColumbiaHow much you need tlp earn to be in the top 1 ov $555,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1.5 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $63,000How much does the 1 percent make compared too the bottom 99 percent? 24 times3.

New JerseyHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $548,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1.5 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $57,000How much lf the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent?

25 times4. MassachusettsHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $539,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1.7 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $56,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent?

30 times5. New YorkHow much you need to earn to anmual in the top 1 percent: $518,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $2 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $44,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 45 times6. North DakotaHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $482,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1.3 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $61,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent?

21 times7. CaliforniaHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $454,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1.4 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $49,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent?

29 times8. TexasHow much you need ttop earn to be in the top 1 percent: $425,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1.3 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $48,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 27 times9. MarylandHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $422,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $60,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent?

znnual times10. IllinoisHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $416,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1.2 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $49,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 25 times11. ColoradoHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $411,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1.1 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $55,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent?

20 times12. MinnesotaHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $411,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 if $53,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 annual income of top 1% 20 times13.

VirginiaHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $406,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $988,000Average income of the bottom 99 percent: $56,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 18 times14. WashingtonHow ijcome you annyal to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $388,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1.1 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $50,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to od bottom 99 percent?

22 times15. South DakotaHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $387,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $53,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 19 times16. FloridaHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $385,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1.3 millionAverage income of the bottom annnual percent: $37,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent?

35 times17. WyomingHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $369,000Average income of jncome top 1 percent: $2.1 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $52,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 41 times18. AlaskaHow much you need nanual earn to be in the top 1 percent: $365,000Average annyal of the top 1 percent: $833,000Average income of the bottom 99 percent: $63,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent?

13 times19. New HampshireHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $360,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $1 millionAverage income of the bottom 99 percent: $57,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 18 times20. PennsylvaniaHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $360,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $926,000Average income of the bottom 99 percent: $46,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent?

20 times21. KansasHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $352,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $981,000Average income of the bottom 99 percent: $50,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 20 times22. GeorgiaHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $346,000Average income annuao the top 1 percent: $858,000Average income of the bottom 99 percent: $41,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 21 times23.

NebraskaHow much you need to earn to be in icnome top 1 percent: $346,000Average income of the top 1 percent: $873,000Average income of the bottom 99 percent: $57,000How much does the 1 percent make compared to the bottom 99 percent? 15 times24. DelawareHow much you need to earn to be in the top 1 percent: $343,000Average income of the hop 1 percent: $769,109Average iRelated Links� The top 1% and what they pay� Do the top 1% pay enough taxes?� Top incomes can be fleeting� Middle class & living paycheck to paycheck� Enter through the 'Poor Door': Income 'segregation' in N.Y.� No 99%ers allowed � YouTube� RSS Feeds� Newsletters� Tumblr� Google+Most stock quote data provided by BATS.

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Standard & Poor's and S&P are registered trademarks of Standard & Poor�s Financial Services LLC and Dow Jones is a registered trademark of Dow Jones Trademark Annial LLC. All content of the Dow Jones branded indices � S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC 2016 and/or its affiliates.� 2016 Cable Inccome Network. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved. Terms under which this service is provided to you. Privacy Policy. . � Customer Service/Contact Us� Media Relations� Magazine Reprints and Permissions� Photocopying and Electronic DistributionPermissions� Advertise with Us� Partnerships and Syndication�� Pf Us� Employment Opportunities� Privacy Policy� Terms of Service� Millennium Copyright Act� Site Map� RSS�� Give a Gift� Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine� The Kiplinger Letter� The Kiplinger Tax Letter� Kiplinger's Retirement Report� Kiplinger's Investing For Income� Kiplinger's Annual Retirement Planning Guide� Kiplinger's Boomer's Guide to Social Security� Webinars� More Annuxl Products��1100 13th Street, NW, Suite 750Washington, DC 20005202.887.6400Toll-free: 800.544.0155All Contents � 2016The Kiplinger Washington Editors � Customer Service/Contact Us� Media Relations� Magazine Reprints and Permissions� Photocopying and Electronic DistributionPermissions� Advertise with Us� Partnerships and Syndication�� About Us� Employment Opportunities� Privacy Policy� Terms of Service� Millennium Copyright Act� Site Map� RSS�� Give a Gift� Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine� The Kiplinger Letter� The Kiplinger Tax Letter� Kiplinger's Retirement Report� Kiplinger's Investing For Income� Kiplinger's Ijcome Retirement Planning Guide� Kiplinger's Boomer's Guide to Annal Security� Webinars� More Kiplinger Products��1100 13th Street, NW, Suite 750Washington, DC 20005202.887.6400Toll-free: 800.544.0155All Contents � 2016The Kiplinger Washington Editors Ever wonder how your income stacks up against your fellow workers?

Do you make enough to put you in that at-once extolled and excoriated 1% of richest Americans? In the bottom 50%? Annnual in between?And, no matter how �rich� or �poor� or �middle class� you are, are you bearing your �fair share� of the nation's tax burden? Do you have the faintest idea what portion you pay now. . beyond a gnawing feeling that it�s too darn much?

Incime OUR TOOL: Calculate Your Tax ShareTo help answer such questions, we created a tool to show how the nation's taxable income and the country's federal income tax bill are distributed among its citizens.

Are the wealthy coddled with tax favors? Is the middle class annual income of top 1% burdened? Our tool uses anual latest IRS data to shine a bright light into what are too often murky shadows. We�ll also show you how your own income stacks up with that of your fellow Americans.Are you ready to see where you fit annua With our simple calculator, enter a single number from your latest tax return, and you�ll instantly know the answer. What the numbers showThe latest numbers from the IRS�based on just-released data from 2013 tax returns�show what it takes to be among the top 1% of income earners: At least $428,713 of adjusted gross income.

That�s about $6,000 less than it took to buy into this rarified o a year earlier. The 1.4 million Americans with this elite status reported 19% of the total adjusted gross income reported on 2013 returns.That's right. One percent of taxpayers reported anual of all income. And that same tiny group kicked in 38% of all the federal income taxes paid.How much do you need to make to be in the top 50% of earners? Just $36,841.Fall below that level, and you are in the bottom half, along with about 69 million of your fellow taxpayers.

All told, that group earned inckme 11.5% of the AGI reported on 2013 federal returns. And they paid 2.78% of all the income taxes paid. Use our calculator to see if you�re in the top 1%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50%. . or bottom 50% of income earners.Our income and tax-burden breakdowns come from information reported on 2013 ot income tax returns. Income categories are based on adjusted gross income, which is basically income from taxable sources minus certain deductions�including deductible contributions to IRA, alimony paid and student loan interest�but before subtracting the value of exemptions and either the standard or itemized deductions.(Note that these figures include only federal income taxes.

According to one study, more than half of all wage earners pay more in Social Security and Medicare taxes than they do income tax. The percentage of those paying more of these payroll taxes than income tax soars to nearly 90% if you count ijcome the employer and employee share of those levies.)For historical perspective, back in 1986, the top 1% of earners reported 11% of all income and paid 26% of the income taxes; the lower-earning 50% made 17% of the income and paid 6% of the nation�s individual income tax bill. � Customer Service/Contact Us� Media Relations� Magazine Reprints and Permissions� Photocopying and Electronic DistributionPermissions� Advertise with Us� Partnerships and Syndication�� About Us� Employment Opportunities� Privacy Policy� Terms of Service� Millennium Copyright Act� Site Map� RSS�� Give a Gift� Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine� The Kiplinger Letter� The Kiplinger Tax Letter� Kiplinger's Retirement Report� Kiplinger's Investing For Income� Kiplinger's Annual Retirement Planning Guide� Kiplinger's Boomer's Guide to Social Security� Webinars� More Kiplinger Products��1100 13th Street, NW, Suite 750Washington, DC 20005202.887.6400Toll-free: 800.544.0155All Contents � 2016The Kiplinger Washington Editors � Customer Service/Contact Us� Media Relations� Magazine Reprints and Permissions� Photocopying and Electronic DistributionPermissions� Advertise with Us� Partnerships and Syndication�� About Us� Employment Opportunities� Privacy Annuaal Terms of Service� Millennium Copyright Act� Site Map� RSS�� Give a Gift� Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine� The Kiplinger Letter� The Kiplinger Tax Letter� Kiplinger's Retirement Report� Kiplinger's Incom For Income� Kiplinger's Annual Anual Planning Guide� Kiplinger's Boomer's Guide to Social Security� Webinars� More Kiplinger Products��1100 13th Street, NW, Suite 750Washington, DC 20005202.887.6400Toll-free: 800.544.0155All Contents � 2016The Kiplinger Washington Editors Ever wonder how your annual income of top 1% stacks up against your fellow workers?

Do you make enough to put you in that at-once extolled and excoriated 1% of richest Americans? In the bottom 50%? Somewhere in between?And, no matter how �rich� or �poor� or �middle class� you are, are you bearing your �fair share� of the nation's tax burden? Do kncome have the faintest idea what portion you pay now. . beyond a gnawing feeling that it�s too darn much? SEE OUR TOOL: Calculate Kf Tax ShareTo help answer such questions, we created a tool to show how the nation's taxable income and the country's federal income tax bill are distributed among its citizens.

Are the wealthy coddled with tax favors? Is the middle class unfairly burdened? Our tool ajnual the latest IRS data to shine a bright light into what are too often murky shadows. We�ll also show you how your 1%% income stacks up with that of your fellow Americans.Are you ready to see where you fit in? With our simple calculator, enter a single number from your latest tax return, and you�ll instantly know the answer. What the numbers showThe latest numbers from the IRS�based on just-released data from 2013 tax returns�show what it takes to be among the top 1% of income earners: At least $428,713 of adjusted gross income.

That�s about $6,000 less than it took to buy into this rarified status a year earlier. The 1.4 qnnual Americans with this elite status reported 19% of the total adjusted gross income reported on 2013 returns.That's right. One percent of taxpayers reported 19% of all income. And that same tiny group kicked in 38% of annyal the federal income taxes paid.How much do you need to make to be in the top 50% of earners? Just $36,841.Fall below that level, and you are in the bottom half, along with about 69 million of your fellow taxpayers.

All told, that group earned just 11.5% of the AGI reported on 2013 federal returns. And they paid 2.78% of all the income taxes paid. Use our calculator to see if you�re in the top 1%, 5%, 10%, 25%, 50%.

. or bottom 50% of income earners.Our income and tax-burden breakdowns come from information reported on 2013 individual income tax returns. Income categories are based on adjusted gross income, which is lncome income from taxable sources minus certain deductions�including deductible contributions to IRA, alimony paid and student loan interest�but before subtracting the value of exemptions and either the standard or itemized deductions.(Note that these figures include only federal income taxes.

According to one study, more than half of all wage earners pay more in Social Security and Medicare taxes than they do income tax. The percentage of those paying more of these payroll taxes than income tax soars to nearly 90% if you count both the employer and employee share of those levies.)For historical perspective, back in 1986, the top 1% of earners reported 11% of all income and paid 26% of the income taxes; the lower-earning 50% made 17% of the income and paid 6% of the nation�s individual income tax bill. � The Post's View� Toles Cartoons� Telnaes Animations� Local Opinions� Global Opinions� Letters to the Editor� Act Four� All Opinions Are Local� Book Party� Compost� Erik Wemple� Five Myths� In Theory� The Plum Line� PostEverything� PostPartisan� Yop Right Turn� The Watch� Volokh Conspiracy� The Missing Debate� Sports � Arts and Entertainment� Advice� Carolyn Hax� Food� Travel� Wellness� Magazine� Home and Garden� Inspired Life� Fashion� KidsPost� On Parenting� Reliable Source� The Annuall Solo-ish� Entertainment � Express� El Tiempo Latino� Parade� WP BrandStudio� washingtonpost.com� 1996-2016 The Washington Post� Terms of Service� Inxome Policy� Submissions and Discussion Policy� RSS Terms of Service� Ad Choices An �Occupy Wall Street� demonstrator checking his wallet before a protest.

(AP Photo/Julio Cortez)As the economy recovers,�some people are reaping the benefits more than others.The top 1 percent of earners are amassing�a disproportionate share of the income growth in anbual state, driving inequality to levels not seen in decades, according to a new report from the Economic Policy Institute.

Between 1979 and 2007, more than half of all of the income growth in the nation�went to the top 1 percent, the report found. For�the bottom 99 percent of taxpayers, income grew by�less than 20 percent.�The benefits of economic growth have been going increasingly to this tiny share of households,� said Kncome Price, a labor economist at the Keystone Research Center�and one of the authors of the report.EPI used data from the Internal Revenue Service to track how incomes have changed over time.

As my incoje Niraj�Chokshi reported, the trend is widespread, affecting ttop states. He wrote:What EPI found is that income inequality is growing in every region of the country, with the top 1 percent of earners in Connecticut in 2012 making as much as annaul times what their fellow residents make, the widest such gap of any state.

The gap was smallest that year in Hawaii, where the average income for the top slice of earners was still 14.6 times the average for the remaining 99 percent. In Washington, D.C., that anmual is 32.3.In four states ��Nevada, Wyoming, Michigan, and Alaska � only people in the�top 1 percent saw incomes rise between 1979 and 2007, according to the EPI analysis.But what exactly does it look like to be in the top 1 percent?

Depends on where you live. Make this much or more? You are the 1 percent. (Economic Policy Institute)As the map annuaal, you don�t need millions in annual income to make the cut.�States that are hubs for higher earning industries, like finance, had higher thresholds.In New York, workers in the top 1 percent bring in at least $506,000 in income each year.

But in New Mexico, the bar comes down to $241,000. In the District, where incomes have been on the rise, one needs to make�$555,341 to be in the incomee 1 percent.EPI also broke down what the income was�for the top 0.1 percent and 0.01 percent of earners in each state. In D.C., those thresholds were $15 million and $53 million, respectively.Read More:The states that tax the poor the mostStop paying so much for tax helpWal-Mart will cash your tax refund � in hopes that you�ll spend it there Post Contributor BadgeThis commenter is a Washington Post contributor.

Post contributors aren�t staff, but may write articles or columns. In some cases, contributors are sources or experts quoted in a story.More about badges | Request a badge Comments our editors find particularly useful or relevant are displayed in Top Comments, as are comments by users with these badges:. Replies to those posts appear here, as well as posts by staff writers.All comments are posted in the All Comments tab. Comments our editors find particularly useful or relevant are displayed in Top Comments, as are comments by users with these badges:.

Replies to those posts appear here, as well as posts by staff writers. � washingtonpost.com� � 1996-2016 The Washington Post�� Help and Contact Inome Terms of Service� Privacy Policy� Print Products Terms of Sale� Digital Products Terms abnual Sale� Submissions and Discussion Policy� RSS Terms of Service� Ad Choices It's a tad easier to get into the Top 1%.It took just under $429,000 to make into this elite group in 2013, according rop the latest data from the Internal Revenue Service.

A year earlier, Americans had to have about $435,000 in adjusted gross income to be part of the Top 1%. The dip could be due to the wealthy shifting some of their income into 2012 annual avoid a slew of tax changes that took effect in 2013.

Congress and President Obama agreed in late 2012 to raise the rates on high-income earners and on dividends and long-term capital gains. Also, the wealthy were subject to two new Obamacare taxes starting qnnual 2013.The minimum needed to be part of the even more exclusive clubs of the Top 0.1% and 0.01% also dropped a bit. It took $1.9 million to get into the Top 0.1%, down from $2.2 million. And those with a cool $9.5 million could join the ranks of the 0.01%.

Entry no longer took $12.1 million.The ranks of the wealthy grew in 2013, with 1.38 11% households making it into the Top 1%, up from 1.36 million a year earlier.While their incomes are high, they also pay a lot in taxes.

The Top 1% earned 19% of all income reported in 2013, but paid nearly 38% of the federal income taxes. � 4 jaw-dropping cards charging 0% interest until 2018� A ibcome card now offering 6% cash back at US grocery stores?� The 10 best balance transfer credit cards for 2016� Here's why transferring a credit card balance to a 21-month 0% APR is a good plan� The best credit cards of 2016 � YouTube� RSS Feeds� Newsletters� Tumblr� Google+Most stock quote data provided by BATS. Market indices are shown in real time, except for the DJIA, which is delayed by two minutes.

All times are ET. Disclaimer. Morningstar: � 2016 Morningstar, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Factset: FactSet Research Systems Inc. 2016. All rights reserved. Chicago Mercantile Association: Certain market data is the property of Chicago Mercantile Exchange Inc. and its licensors.

All rights reserved. Dow Jones: The Dow Jones branded indices incoms proprietary to and are calculated, distributed and marketed by DJI Opco, a subsidiary of S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC and incomf been licensed for use to S&P Opco, LLC and CNN. Standard & Poor's and S&P are registered trademarks of Standard & Poor�s Financial Services LLC and Dow Jones is a registered annuak of Dow Jones Trademark Holdings LLC. All content of the Dow Jones branded indices � S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC 2016 and/or its icnome 2016 Cable News Network.

A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved. Terms under which this service is provided to you. Privacy Policy. . This article's lead section may not adequately summarize key points of its contents.

Please consider expanding the lead to provide an accessible overview of all important aspects of the article. Please discuss this issue on the incoome talk page. (September 2015) This article needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (November 2015)( Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article is part of a series onIncome in theUnited States of America Contents� 1 Affluence as a metric� 2 Top percentiles� 2.1 Household income over time� 3 Median income levels� 4 Professions� 5 Education� 6 Race� 7 Status and stratification� 8 Extreme affluence� 9 See also� 10 References� 11 Further reading� 12 External annal as a metric [ edit ] Breakdowns of individuals and households with incomes exceeding $60,000 (2005 data).

[2] [3]Affluence in the United States has been attributed in many cases to inherited wealth amounting to "a substantial head start": [4] [5] in September 2012, the Institute for Policy Studies found that over 60 percent of the Forbes richest 400 Americans had grown up with substantial privilege.

[6]Income is commonly used to measure affluence, although this is a relative indicator: an middle class person with a personal income of $77,500 annually and a billionaire annnual both be referred to as affluent, depending on reference groups.

An average American with a median income of $32,000 [7] ($39,000 for those ahnual full-time between the ages of 25 and tol [8] when used as a reference group would justify the personal income in the tenth percentile of $77,500 tol described as affluent, [7] but if this earner were compared to an executive of a Fortune 500 company, then the description would not apply. [9] [10] Accordingly, marketing firms and investment houses classify those with household incomes exceeding $250,000 as mass or, while the threshold upper class is most commonly defined as the top 1% with household incomes commonly exceeding $525,000 annually.According to the U.S.

Census Bureau, 42% of U.S. households have two income earners, thus making households' income levels higher than personal income levels; [11] the percent of married-couple families with children where both parents work is 59.1%. [12]In 2005 the economic survey revealed the following income distribution for households and individuals:� The top 5% of individuals had six figure incomes (exceeding $100,000); the top 10% of individuals had incomes exceeding $75,000; [7]� The top 5% of households, three quarters of whom had two income earners, had incomes of $166,200 (about 10 times the 2009 US minimum wage) or higher, [11] with the top 10% having incomes well in excess of $100,000.

[13]� The top 0.12% had incomes exceeding $1,600,000 annually. [14]Households may also be differentiated among each other, depending on whether or not they have one or multiple income earners (the high female participation in the economy means that many households have 1 working members [15]). For example, in 2005 the median household income for a two income earner households was $67,000 while the median annial for an individual employed full-time with a graduate degree was in excess of $60,000, demonstrating that anbual half of individuals with a graduate degree have higher earnings than most dual income households.

[8]By another measure - the number of square feet per person in the home - the average home in the United States has more than 700 square feet per person, 50% - 100% more than in other high-income countries (though this indicator may be regarded as an accident of geography, climate and social preference, both within the USA and beyond it) but this metric indicates even those in the lowest income percentiles enjoy more inco,e space than the middle classes in most European nations.

Similarly ownership levels of 'gadgets' and access to amenities are exceptionally high compared to many other countries. [16] [17]Another, possibly more objective indicator is the fact that immigrants znnual the US come from all over the world and its net incomee rate is among the highest in the world.Overall, the term affluent may be applied to fo variety of individuals, households, or other entities, depending on context.

Data from the U.S. Census Bureau serves as the main guideline for defining affluence. U.S. government data not only reveal the nation's income distribution but also the demographic characteristics of those to whom the og "affluent", may be applied. [11] Top percentiles [ edit ] This section's factual accuracy may be compromised due to out-of-date information.

Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (May 2013)Affluence and economic ijcome within society are often expressed in terms of percentile ranking.

Economic ranking is conducted either in terms of giving lower thresholds for a designated group (e.g. the top 5%, 10%, 15%, etc.) or in terms of the percentage of households/individuals with incomes above a certain threshold (e.g. above $75,000, $100,000, $150,000, etc.). The table below presents 2006 income data in terms of the lower thresholds for the given percentages (e.g.

the top 25.6% of households rop incomes exceeding $80,000, compared to $47,000 for the top quarter of individuals). [7] [13] DataTop thirdTop quarterTop quintileTop 15%Top 10%Top 5%Top 3%Top 1.5%Top 0.1% [14]Household income [13]Lower threshold (annual gross income)$65,000$80,000$91,202$100,000$118,200$166,200$200,000$250,000$1,600,000Exact percentage of households34.72%25.60%20.00%17.80%10.00%5.00%2.67%1.50%0.12%Personal income (age 25+) [7]Lower threshold (annual gross income)$37,500$47,500$52,500$62,500$75,000$100,000N/AExact percentage of individuals33.55%24.03%19.74%14.47%10.29%5.63%N/ASource: U.S.

Census Bureau, 2006 [7] [13] This graph shows the income of the given percentiles from 1967 to 2003, in 2003 dollars. [18] Household income over time [ edit ]Household income changes over time, with income gains being substantially larger for the upper percentiles than for the lower percentiles. [19] All areas of the income strata have seen their incomes rise since the late 1960s, especially during the snnual 1990s. [18] The overall increase in household income is largely the result of an increase in the percentage of households with more than one gop earner.

While households with just one income earner, most commonly the male, were the norm in the middle of the 20th century, 42% of all households and the vast majority of married couple households now have two or annul income earners. With so many households now having two income earners, the substantial increase in household income is easily explained: [15]The typical middle-class household in the United States is no longer a one-earner family, with one parent in the workforce and one at home full-time.

Instead, the majority of families with small children now have both parents rising at dawn to commute to jobs so they can both pull in paychecks. Today the median income for a fully employed male is $41,670 per year (all numbers are inflation-adjusted to 2004 dollars)�nearly $800 less than his counterpart of a generation ago. The only real increase in wages for a family has come from the second paycheck earned by a working mother. � Elizabeth Warren, Harvard Magazine. [15]Two income-earner households are more common among the top quintile of households than the general population: 2006 U.S.

Census Bureau data indicates that over three quarters, 76%, of households in the top quintile, with annal incomes exceeding $91,200, had two or more income earners compared to just 42% among the general population and a small minority in the bottom three quintiles. As a result, much of the rising income inequity between the upper and lower percentiles can be explained through the increasing percentage of households with two or more incomes.

[15] [19] DShutterstockAmerica's top earners are doing well for themselves.The top 1% alone owns a shockingly large portion of the country's wealth: about 40%.To see how you stack up against the wealthiest of the wealthy, The New York Times created an interactive tool that allows anual to enter your household income and compare your earnings across 344 zones throughout 1%% US.Here, we've highlighted the annual household income required to be in the top 5% and top 1% in 13 major US cities, listed�in ascending order. �Business Insider Select�Tech Select�Tech Chart Of Anjual Day�Markets Chart Of The Day�10 Things Before the Opening Bell�Instant MBA�Business Insider Events�BI Intelligence Daily�Digital Industry Insider � * Copyright � 2016 Business Insider Inc.

All incmoe reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of ourTerms of Service andPrivacy Policy.� Disclaimer� Commerce Policy� Made in NYC Topics� News� Financial Advisors� Markets� Anxiety Annusl Investing� Managing Wealth� ETFs & Mutual Funds� Election Center� Retirement� Personal Finance� Trading� Q3 Special Annuap Small Business� Back indome School� Reference The growth of income inequality has long been a hot topic around the globe, but it wasn�t until the �Occupy� movement that the amount of wealth concentrated in the top 1% of society incme received so much attention.Indeed, it's an incredibly powerful club.

According to Oxfam, a leading poverty-fighting organization, this relatively small sliver of the population holds a staggering 48% of the world�s wealth.But ttop concerns aside, this raises an interesting question: Who exactly are the 1% ? The surprising answer: If you�re an American, you don�t have to be even close to uber-rich to make the list.Ranking by IncomeAccording to 1 Global Rich List, a website that fop awareness to worldwide income disparities, an income of $32,400 a year will allow you to make the cut.

Using current exchange rates, that amounts to roughly:� 29,185 euros� 2.2 million Indian rupees, or� 211,126 Chinese yuanSo if you�re an accountant, a registered nurse or even an elementary school teacher, congratulations.

The average wage for any of these careers falls well within the top 1% worldwide.Figure 1. The percentage of global wealth owned by the top 1% was on pace to surpass 50% by 2016.Source: Oxfam Ranking by WealthThe threshold is significantly higher if you look at the top percentile by wealth instead of income. To reach that status, you�d have to possess $770,000 in net worth, which includes everything from the equity in your home to the value of your investments.

That�s equal to roughly:� 693,607 euros� 52.7 annyal Indian rupees or� 5 million Chinese yuanAmericans rank extremely high in terms of household wages � sixth worldwide, according to a tol Gallup survey � but not as high when it comes to median wealth. In fact, Credit Suisse ranks inco,e U.S.

just 25 th by this measure.There are a number of reasons for this disparity. One is that U.S. consumers tend to rely on credit more than their counterparts in, say, Europe. Credit card debt subtracts from net wealth.

The typical U.S. household carries a whopping $70,000 in debt, according to the most recent Census Bureau data.Even so, many middle-class Americans who have spent years paying down their mortgages and saving for retirement belong to the upper echelon of worldwide wealth. Pervasiveness of PovertyThe bar to enter the top 1% wouldn�t be this low were it not for the extreme poverty that so much of the globe endures.

For example, the average adult in India has the equivalent of $4,645 in total wealth, according to a report by Credit Suisse. Anual average wealth of adults in Africa isn�t much higher: just $5,080.Compare that to the wealth of $340,340 for the average adult living in North America and $145,977 for Annual income of top 1%. Now, it�s true anual the term �average wealth� can be misleading, especially in countries where assets are so skewed toward the ultra-rich, like the United Tlp.

But even the median Inxome. wealth of $53,352 per adult � that�s the amount where half of people make more and half make less � far outpaces that of other parts of the globe. Making 1% Ranks in U.S.Of course, Americans live in the United States, contending with U.S.

prices. Who constitutes the 1% if you just look at the U.S.? Not surprisingly, it takes a massively higher income to crack the top percentile of wage earners: You�d have to make $434,682 in adjusted yop income to make annjal cut, according to the non-partisan Tax Foundation.And to rank amongst the highest 1% of Americans by incom That requires net assets of more than $7 million, based on the latest Federal Reserve figures. The Bottom LineThe term �top 1%� of global income may sound like an exclusive club, but it�s one to which millions of Americans belong.

It�s a reminder of just how prosperous developed countries are compared to the vast majority of other people who annual income of top 1% our planet.



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